Posts Tagged ‘Holly Rosen Fink’

Philanthropic Moms: A Year in Review

Wednesday, December 31st, 2014

Philanthropic Moms Logo

Another year — off it goes. And ahead of us lies amazing and endless possibilities for using our power for good.

Before we begin 2015 it seems an ideal time to stop an take a look at some of our past Philanthropic Moms. The honor roll from 2014 is made up of amazing, awe-inspiring women who fill our hearts and our spirits with the way in which they bring energy, enthusiasm and care to all they do.

One of the most fortunate aspects of Forty Weeks is working with such admirable women who balance their roles as mothers and their careers with a passion for giving back to their communities. Philanthropy comes in many shapes and forms — and is directed in as many directions as there are women committed to making difference. And, as 2014 comes to a close, I’ve looked back through this list with awe and excitement and wanted to share the buzz and the love.

Well worth noting, Leticia Barr has brought to life a remarkable way to keep all of us focused and mindful as 2015 begins. The idea of a deed a day, not only of the big but especially the small, meaningful gestures — the kindness that we extend to each other — makes all the difference. Join all of us as we step up and bring life to this remarkable concept. For me — I will be buying a bracelet for my kids and my staffers — hoping that that together we will make a real difference in real time!

Here are the fantastic women Forty Weeks highlighted as Philanthropic Moms for 2014:

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Philanthropic Friday – Philanthropic Moms Honor Roll

Friday, January 24th, 2014

As I sit to write about Holly Rosen Fink, I feel as though I am perhaps about to expose a secret (a very good secret!!!). This is because this week’s Philanthropic Mom – Holly Rosen Fink is at once incredibly generous and productive and, at the same time, so very low–key about the remarkable and regular contribution she makes  - it just “is”. Still, as I stop and consider the history and the quality of Holly’s commitment, I am humbled. I am also inspired. Holly  is tireless  in her quiet strength and  endlessly creative in her on-going effort to make the world a better place. There is no one size fits all in the way Holly gives – she pays careful attention to where the need exists and meets it head on with just the right solution. She casts her net wide, and makes sure that anyone who can join the effort to help does. From clients to kids and everyone in-between – Holly’s army is a sizable and enthusiastic one — all recruited with grace by Holly herself.

When I consider how lucky I am to share Holly and her incredible optimism with you, I am immediately reminded of a quote that seems to really speak to Holly’s remarkable point of view.

“How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world.”

— Anne Frank

This week, get out of the cold and get warm getting to know the wonderful Holly Rosen Fink.

Holly Rosen Fink

The Culture Mom

What makes you a Philanthropic Mom?

As an entrepreneur, I try to associate myself with like-minded organizations and businesses. The majority of my clients have been non-profits or companies out to make a difference (Mothers2Mothers, Every Mother Counts, to name a few). When a client is a for-profit business, I often steer their efforts into the advocacy arena (Ruckus Media Group, She Speaks). As a mom, I am doing my best to raise altruistic children who see the world through the eyes of the less fortunate and make sure they know that their old coats are going to those who need them and that it’s important to take out to think of others and volunteer in various capacities. When they were infants, I took them to the old age home in the area to play with me while the elderly watched along with enjoyment. They have worked in the local pantry and distributed meals at the homeless shelter with me. During the holidays, we often deliver meals to the elderly. As a philanthropist, I try to donate as much money to causes that I care about as possible and I am one of those people who puts my hand in my pocket every time I am asked on the street.

What is an early or stand-out memory of community service, philanthropic commitment or another way in which you felt strongly connected to an issue in the bigger world?

When I was a young girl of about 12, we were shown a film about the Holocaust and I was deeply impacted. Living in Israel years later, I volunteered with an organization for the elderly and went once a week to do crafts and spend time with them. They were all Holocaust survivors and the stories I heard were unlike any I had ever heard. The experience solidified an effort to never let the Holocaust be forgotten, also spending time volunteering at Yad Vashem, Israel’s Holocaust Museum that year. Back in New York, I later interviewed survivors for the Steven Spielberg’s Shoah Foundation which was another commitment that I have always been proud of. Just a few months ago, I led a Holocaust film series at my synagogue which attracted and educated hundreds of our members. This is a cause I feel very strongly about and will continue to make sure no one ever forgets the 6 million needlessly killed less than 60 years ago.

Who was your biggest philanthropic influence?

My mother is the best role model I could ever ask for. She has always given to other people first and has a heart of gold. If I can leave a legacy with my own children and give them a quarter of the heart she has, I will have done something right.

What about being a Philanthropic Mom makes you most proud?

I’m very low key about my philanthropic efforts. I don’t really talk about them as much as I could anywhere, including social media. I’ve driven gently used toys and clothes into the city to donate to Room to Grow; I took a packed van of clothing, medical supplies, toys and more countless times during Hurricane Sandy. The important thing is not to talk about it, but just to do it and include my children in my efforts. I want them to watch and be a part of what I do so that they become philanthropic as they get older.

What is the legacy of change you want to leave behind?  

My daughter is 10 and is saying that she wants to become a human rights lawyer. I know she’s young and this could change, but the idea profoundly warms my heart. I am part of the Shot at Life campaign and ONE Organization initiatives, and my kids have witnessed my work with St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. I talk about my work with these organizations and hope that they are listening and they will go into helping professions that will help change the world.

What would your kids say about all of this?

Hopefully, they are proud of their mother, but at their ages, I’m not sure they know exactly what it all means.