Posts Tagged ‘Sandie Chen’

Philanthropic Friday – Philanthropic Moms Honor Roll

Friday, May 30th, 2014

Eating is so intimate. It’s very sensual. When you invite someone to sit at your table and you want to cook for them, you’re inviting a person into your life.

Maya Angelou

And this is exactly how Sandie Angulo Chen and I got connected – food…

Sandie and I were introduced via a mutual and dear friend, Amy Oztan. When Sandie moved south, Brooklyn’s loss was DC’s gain. And, as the fierce winds of Hurricane Sandy began to blow – I sent out an offer via Twitter, asking who might appreciate some great cheeses and give them a home (as I was vacating my house-taking shelter from the storm)? Sandie said yes, trekked out in the dark pre-storm hours and gathered up my goodies. She was not fazed by the storm, in fact, she was set for the adventure. So off she went, cheeses in hand and ready to take whatever came her way. She and her family enjoyed the cheeses through the storm. A fact that still makes me smile…

Sandie and I were fast friends – she came with an irresistible and bubbly passion for things I hold quite dear: books, food, community and yes, people. One of the first things that struck me about Sandie, she was well versed at the art of people  - she knew how to connect with others and she did so with total grace and much laughter.  Sandie has a big, brave heart that gives and gives. She creates instant comfort and connection — a rare gift.  She sees, she reacts and it is all a matter of fact (yes that rhymes, but she is a literary soul, after all!).

Sandie has an amazing world view coupled with the most incredible tools for sharing her perspective. One of which is her writing. She writes in an approachable, open and honest way. People are drawn to her writing – it, like Sandie,  is at once compellingly realistic and at the same time, highly optimistic. Those who follow her writing (movie reviews on Common Sense Media for example) appreciate that Sandie lives in the real world. And it is from there she sets out to make it better. Be it rolling up her sleeves or encouraging those around her to jump in and make a difference – Sandie is present and certainly accounted for. She is leaving a mark in all the best ways.

And now, meet my friend Sandie Angulo Chen.

Sandie Angulo Chen


TeenLitRocks &  The DC Moms 

What makes you a Philanthropic Mom? I’m a Philanthropic Mom, because I believe in living with a spirit of kindness, of generosity, of loving others. Those beliefs are rooted in my faith and my community, and I believe it’s part of my duty (and joy) as a mother to raise my kids to believe they can make a difference, help others, and be a force of good in the world.

What is an early or stand-out memory of community service, philanthropic commitment or another way in which you felt strongly connected to an issue in the bigger world? I grew up in a multi-generational household incredibly close to my grandmother and great-aunt, and I vividly remember being in sixth grade and horrified to find out that many elderly have no family  to care for them or visit them. I helped my elementary school organize regular visits to a local senior citizens’ home. We were all 11, so at first it was awkward, but eventually the kids relaxed, the residents relaxed, and we started to look forward to our older friends. That was the first time I felt committed to community service.

Who was your biggest philanthropic influence? My grandmother, may she rest in peace. She taught me that philanthropy and kindness should be a personal and sometimes quiet endeavor, not something to boast about or put on an application. I was not-quite 13 when she died, but she lived with me and had a profound influence on my life. Her example of a life well lived will stay with me forever.

What about being a Philanthropic Mom makes you most proud? That being a mother only deepened my desire to be philanthropic — to give unconditionally.

What is the legacy of change you want to leave behind? That there’s an indescribable joy in being part of your community, of being a believer in hope and change.

What would your children say about all of this? My children have a commitment to helping others too, whether it’s through Scouts, our church, or in our own family. They understand that even the youngest of kids can still be kind, selfless, and generous.